FCC News Brief - October 16, 2017

Ryan Benk reports for WJCT – “Sen. Rob Bradley’s… proposal to increase funding for the St. Johns River, springs and the Keystone Heights Lake Region cleared its first legislative hurdle Monday, gaining unanimous approval from the Senate’s Environmental Preservation and Conservation Committee… ‘I think when we take on this responsibility of expending these Amendment 1 dollars that it’s important that we allocate in a manner that reflects all parts of the state,’ [Sen. Bradley] said. ‘It was important, the work that we’ve done on the Everglades… I think included on this list needs to be this area of the state and this important resource as well.’ Last year the Legislature allocated a little more than $13 million, only $5 million of which would be recurring, to the St. Johns River… Meanwhile, millions more was spent on projects in Central and South Florida… Bradley’s bill wasn’t the only conservation budget proposal to unanimously pass the committee Monday. Another measure, sponsored by Sen. Jack Latvala… would allocate at least $50 million annually for beach renourishment and repair... ‘…[W]ith a little bit of elementary math, you can add up all the different percentages and dollar figures that we are proposing be used for the Land Acquisition Trust Fund,’ Latvala said. ‘At some point in time, probably in the Appropriations Committee, we’ll have to put all those bills that we have this year and the bills that we passed over the last couple of cycles on one sheet and figure out how we divide it up. A lot of good ideas just X amount of dollars.’… Amendment 1… is expected to bring… $862.2 million next fiscal year…” Read St. Johns River Funding Bill Passes First Committee Unanimously

Jim Turner reports for the News Service of Florida – “Three Florida parks in the Keys opened to the public Friday for the first time since Hurricane Irma, as the state looks at overall storm damage to its parks topping $55 million… David Clark, acting deputy secretary of land and recreation at the Department of Environmental Protection, said the costs could grow… The state recorded $1.1 million in revenue from its parks for September. But that number comes, for example, with a projected $1.7 million in lost revenue due to overnight cancellations. One positive for the state is that the financial hit may have been tempered because September is historically the lowest month for revenue, at about $4 million annually…” Read State parks take financial hit from hurricane

Palmer writes for the News Chief – “Nathaniel Reed was a major player in some of the most important environmental reforms that have occurred in Florida and the nation in recent decades. I first met him at meetings of 1000 Friends of Florida, an organization he helped to found in 1986 to influence growth decisions in Florida in the early days of growth management following the passage of Florida’s first growth-management law in 1985… He recounts the fight to stop a proposed jetport in the still-unprotected Big Cypress Swamp in the late 1960s that could have encouraged a land boom of urban sprawl at a time when Florida had virtually no growth or environmental regulations. At the time, he was chief environmental adviser to Gov. Claude Kirk, who agreed to form a state environmental agency, something that really hadn’t existed before then… He also recounts how environmental policy debates were conducted in the years before public-records and public-meetings laws in Florida, including an instance in which he was forcibly ejected from a gathering hosted by Gov. Haydon Burns, Kirk’s predecessor, after criticizing the lack of opportunities for opponents of the controversial Cross-Florida Barge Canal to speak. The canal was finally killed by President Richard Nixon, for whom Reed served as assistant secretary of the interior for fish and wildlife and parks. His Interior Department tenure provided Reed with an opportunity to affect national environmental policy. That included the decisions to ban the pesticide DDT, to protect bald eagles from poisoning…, to end the destructive channelization of streams in the Southeast, the protection of more land for conservation from Alaska to Florida and the approval of the Endangered Species Act. What comes through in all of these accounts is that these were major, politically charged decisions that did not occur until after extended internal and external debates and negotiations. As some of our current political leaders continue to work to gut environmental and growth regulations, reading Reed’s accounts should give readers an appreciation of how hard-fought earlier environmental victories were…” Read Book recounts important environmental battles

Kate Payne reports for WUSF – “Every session, Florida lawmakers fight over funding for a river, storm water system or sewage plant in their district… But Frank Bernardino with Florida Water Advocates says focusing on individual line items isn’t addressing the state’s growing needs, and leaves the wastewater, groundwater and drinking water projects vulnerable to vetoes… ‘This is important to me because it’s something that I’ve always had issues with, the fact that we have these food fights over water. And whoever is in a position, their district could either benefit or hurt from that,’ (Sen.) Hutson said. Bernardino’s solution is for lawmakers to fund the state’s water projects similar to transportation infrastructure, with a five-year statewide plan and dedicated funding. ‘There’s no reason why we cannot build a structure that is needs-based, science-based, that is defensible, that would allow for appropriate investment in the most needed infrastructure,’ Bernardino said… Florida needs to invest $16.4 billion in drinking water infrastructure by 2030.” Read Environmentalist Wants More Stable Funding Stream for Water Projects

Ledyard King reports for USA Today – “Internal memos show top Trump administration officials knew extending the recreational fishing season in the Gulf of Mexico from three to 42 days this summer would lead to significant overfishing. But they did it anyway.” Read Trump officials extended red snapper season despite knowing it would lead to overfishing

Wes Siler reports for Outside – “Utah Congressman Rob Bishop has been trying to erode the Antiquities Act for most of his political career. But his latest salvo – a House resolution… that attempts to impose massive new limits on Presidents’ ability to preserve public land – is the law’s biggest threat yet… The GOP’s main objection to the Antiquities Act is that it places no hard limits on the size of national monuments and doesn’t provide a clear limit on the kinds of features a monument should protect. [Under] H.R. 2990… a President could only designate a monument to preserve specific artifacts. Natural beauty, historical importance or extreme biodiversity wouldn’t cut it as adequate reasons to protect the land… Bishop’s resolution attempts to impose dramatic limits on the size of a new monument. ‘Land may not be declared under this section in a configuration that would create a national monument that is more than 640 acres.’… Bishop wants to slow the (approval) process down even more. For proposed designations larger than 640 acres, his bill requires approval of the Department of Interior or the Department of Agriculture (depending on which manages the public land in question), before going to both county and state governments for further approval… Currently, there is no accepted legal mechanism for President Donald Trump to abolish or reduce a designation. Bishop wants to change that. His bill grants a President the authority to reduce any monument by 85,000 acres or less by simple proclamation. Larger reductions are possible with the approval of county and state governments and the Department of the Interior or the Department of Agriculture.” Read How Rob Bishop Plans to Gut the Antiquities Act

Lisa Friedman reports for The New York Times – “President Trump has nominated a former top Texas environmental regulator, who has argued that carbon dioxide is a harmless gas that should not be regulated, to be the White House senior advisor on environmental policy… Kathleen Hartnett White will lead the Council on Environmental Quality if confirmed by the Senate… This week, Mr. Trump nominated Barry Lee Myers, the chief executive of AccuWeather, a for-profit weather forecasting company, to lead the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration… Environmentalists say Mr. Trump is stacking agencies with those who either reject the scientific consensus that human-made emissions cause climate change or lack the scientific qualifications for their jobs… Mrs. White also has called renewable energy ‘unreliable and parasitic,’ described global warming as ‘a creed, a faith, a dogma that has little to do with science,’ and asserted that science does not dictate policy in democracies… Senator Brian Schatz… said in a statement that as head of a for-profit weather forecasting service, Mr. Myers essentially viewed NOAA as a direct competitor, since the agency provides forecasts for free.” Read Trump Names Former Texas Regulator as White House Environmental Adviser

Kate Connolly reports for The Guardian – “Leading climate scientists have warned that geoengineering research could be hijacked by climate change deniers as an excuse not to reduce CO2 emissions… Earlier this year, Keith, a professor of applied physics at Harvard announced plans to conduct an outdoor trial into stratospheric aerosol injection, involving launching a high-altitude balloon that will spray a small quantity of reflective particles into the stratosphere… GE [is] an umbrella term for a range of techniques to deliberately adjust the climate in an effort to mitigate global warming. They include reflecting sunlight from space, adding huge quantities of lime or iron to the oceans, pumping deep cold nutrient-rich waters to the surface of the oceans and irrigating vast swaths of desert to grow trees… ‘All the techniques being proposed have potentially severe environmental impacts,’ said Silvia Riberio of the ETC Group… Concerns focus on techniques such as stratospheric aerosol injection, which some experts say has the potential to reduce the amount of rain from Asian and African monsoons and could have a devastating impact on the food supply of billions of people. Aerosol injection also has the potential to reduce the ozone layer and heighten the risk of exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Other possible side effects of GE may be an increase in ocean acidification, a change in weather patterns, a rapid rise in temperatures, and a huge uptake in the use of agricultural land, all of which could prompt mass migration of millions of climate change refugees.” Read Geoengineering is not a quick fix for climate change, experts warn Trump

 

 

 

From Our Readers

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Upcoming Environmental Events    

October 16, 9:30 am – Attend the Suwannee County Delegation meeting at City Hall (101 White Ave SE) in Live Oak. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 16, 9:30 am – Attend the Orange County Delegation meeting on the 1st Floor of the Orange County Administration Center (201 South Rosalind Ave.) in Orlando. Testimony from citizens and community entities will begin at 2:30 PM. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 16, 2:00 pm – Attend the Columbia County Delegation meeting at the Administration Room of Florida Gateway College (149 SE College PL) in Lake City. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 16, 2:30 pm – Attend the Hernando County Delegation meeting at the Hernando County Commission Chambers (20 N. Main St., Room 263) in Brookesville. Contact Dorothy Dilworth beforehand and let her know you’d like to speak at the meeting. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 16, 5:00 pm – Attend the Taylor County Delegation meeting at 224 South Jefferson Street in Perry. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 16, 5:30 pm – Attend the Santa Rosa County Delegation meeting at Pensacola State College South Santa Rosa Center (5075 Gulf Breeze Parkway) in Gulf Breeze. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 17, 9:00 am – Attend the Palm Beach County Delegation meeting at the Solid Waste Authority Auditorium (7501 N. Jog Road) in West Palm Beach. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 17, 6:00 pm – Attend the Madison County Delegation meeting at 229 SW Pinckney St., Suite 107 in Madison. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 18, 9:00 am – Attend the Lee County Delegation meeting in the Nursing Building (Room AA-177) of Florida Southwestern State College at 8099 College Parkway in Fort Myers. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 18, 9:00 am – Attend the Broward County Delegation meeting at the Sunrise Civic Center (10610 West Oakland Park, Blvd) in Sunrise. You are encouraged to sign up to speak by October 15th by clicking here. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 18, 12:00 pm – Attend 1000 Friends of Florida’s webinar: Implementing Florida 2070: Successful Local Conservation Ballot Measures in Florida. The Trust for Public Land’s Will Abberger and Pegeen Hanrahan will share proven strategies to assist Florida communities with the design and passage of local ballot measures to generate new public funds for parks and land conservation. For more information and to register, click here. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 18, 1:00 pm – Attend the Sumter County Delegation meeting in the conference room of The Villages Sumter County Service Center (7375 Powell Rd) in Wildwood. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 18, 4:00 pm – Attend the Clay County Delegation meeting on the 4th Floor of the Administration Building at 477 Houston Street in Green Cover Springs. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 18, 6:30 pm – The Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute, the Center for Earth Jurisprudence, and the League of Women Voters of Orange County, Florida invite you to join us for an informational program on restoring the Wekiva River and Springs. Speakers include Dr. Robert Knight of FSI, Margaret Stewart of CEJ, and a panel discussion featuring local and state leaders on water initiatives for the upcoming 2018 legislative session. This event is free and open to the public. Doors open at 5:30 with light refreshments served. For more information, and to register, click here.

October 19, 9:00 am – Attend the Martin County Delegation meeting at Indian River State College Wolf High – Technology Center (2400 E. Salerno Road) in Stuart. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 19, 9:00 am – Attend the Collier County Delegation meeting at North Collier Regional Park (15000 Livingston Rd.) in Naples. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 19, 9:00 am – Attend the Charlotte County Delegation meeting at the Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association (2001 Shreve St.) in Punta Gorda. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 19, 9:00 am – Attend the Manatee County Delegation meeting at the Manatee County Board of County Commission Chambers (1112 Manatee Ave W) in Bradenton. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 19, 1:00 pm – Attend the Marion County Delegation meeting in the Klein Center at the College of Central Florida Auditorium (3001 SW College Rd) in Ocala. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 19, 2:00 pm – Attend the St. Lucie County Delegation meeting at Indian River State College Kight Center for Emerging Technologies (3209 Virginia Avenue) in Fort Pierce. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 19, 6:30 pm – Attend “Natural Treasures of the Florida Panhandle,” a presentation by Bruce Means, Coastal Plains Institute, at The King Life Sciences Building, FSU, in Tallahassee.

October 20, 9:00 am – Attend the St. Johns County Delegation meeting at the St. Johns County Auditorium in the County Administration Building (500 San Sebastian View) in St. Augustine. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 20, 10:00 am – Attend the Hendry County Delegation meeting at LaBelle City Hall (481 W. Hickpochee Ave.) in LaBelle. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 20, 4:00 pm – Attend the Flagler County Delegation meeting at the City of Palm Coast Council Chamber (160 Lake Ave) in Palm Coast. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 21, 1:00 pm – Attend a Legislative Training Workshop hosted by the Sierra Club-Suwannee-St. John’s Group, the League of Women Voters of Citrus County, and the Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists Social Justice Committee at the Dunnellon Public Library (20351 Robinson Road) in Dunnellon. Attendance is free, limited to the first 50 people to register. Panelists for Q&A include: Florida Senator Charlie Dean, Bob Palmer, PhD, former Staff Director of the Committee on Science, Space and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives; Brain Coleman, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners; Dave Cullen, Sierra Club lobbyist; Walter Green, Dunnellon Mayor; Whitey Markle, Chair of Sierra Club Suwannee St-Johns group; and Nathan Whitt, former Dunnellon Mayor. For more information, contact Kathryn Taubert at kataubert@gmail.com.

October 28, 11:30 am – Join the Silver Springs Alliance for a scavenger hunt as you paddle this iconic waterway in Silver Springs.  Channel the spirits of Florida's river past by dressing up in a costume that reflects Florida's cultural heritage: Spanish conquistadors, pioneers, steamboat travelers, or movie characters from the Spring's film legacy!  Be creative and win a prize in our costume contest! All ages are welcome! Proceeds from this event will support the Silver Springs Alliance’s efforts to protect Silver Springs and River. For more information and to register, click here.

October 30, 4:00 pm – Attend the Nassau County Delegation meeting at the Nassau County Commission Chamber (96135 Nassau Place, Suite 1) in Yulee. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 30, 5:30 pm – Attend the Leon County Delegation meeting at the Leon County Board of County Commission Chambers (5th Floor of the Leon County Courthouse at 301 S Monroe St) in Tallahassee. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

October 31, 2:30 pm – Attend the Polk County Delegation meeting at the Florida Department of Citrus (605 E Main St) in Bartow. Tell your Delegation that you want the LARGEST SHARE of Amendment One funds to be dedicated annually to land conservation programs. For more information, contact floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

 

Do you know of an upcoming environmental event or meeting you would like to include in the FCC News Brief? Send us a quick e-mail and we will include it for you.

 

We hope you enjoy this service and find it valuable. Our goal is to provide you with the latest environmental news from around the state. Our hope is that you will use this information to more effectively and frequently contact your elected representatives, and add your voice to the growing chorus of Floridians concerned about the condition of our environment and the recent direction of environmental policies.

Please encourage your friends, family, and co-workers to join the FCC and subscribe to the Daily News Brief (both free). Also, check out our FCC Facebook page.

Please send all suggestions, comments, and criticism to Gladys Delgadillo at floridaconservationcoalition@gmail.com.

 

About the FCC: The Florida Conservation Coalition (FCC) is composed of over 80 conservation-minded organizations and over two thousand individuals devoted to protecting and conserving Florida’s land, fish and wildlife, and water resources.  

For more information on the FCC visit https://www.wearefcc.org/



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