FCC News Brief - August 26, 2019

Read Florida must protect the Florida Wildlife Corridor as it plans new toll roads - “This Tuesday, 200 leaders from around the state will gather at the Tampa Convention Center to begin designing the future of wild Florida. That’s not the stated purpose of the meeting, but it could be the effect. In reality, people are gathering to start planning three toll roads, but a lot more is at stake. I remember taking part in a planning exercise at the same convention center in 2006. Reality Check Tampa Bay brought together 300 community leaders to envision infrastructure for a projected doubling of Tampa Bay’s population. We divided into teams around table-sized maps. Each team was given yellow and red Legos to represent new residential and commercial development and yellow and red ribbon to represent roadways and public transit. I raised my hand and asked whether there were any green Legos or ribbons that could represent new conservation areas and wildlife corridors. The organizers actually had green dots for planning green space ­— but had forgotten to pass them out. I was baffled that the most fundamental and necessary infrastructure — green infrastructure — was so easily left out of the planning process...Thirteen years later, as Florida’s development plans surge forward, the green dots are once again at risk of being forgotten. So I’m raising my hand again. What if we were to give the road planning task forces some stacks of green dots — the option of first protecting a statewide network of connected green space, and then developing potential new roads and developments around it?...What’s missing from the case for toll roads, but is made clear in the Florida 2070 report, are the effects of Florida’s expanding population on our natural resources. Based on our current development patterns, with every three million new residents that move to Florida, one million acres of natural habitat is lost. If Florida’s population grows as Wilson and Florida 2070 have predicted, and the development of new roads and housing continues according to current trends, that growth will destroy 5 million acres of high priority wildlife habitat – or nearly all of the missing links in the Florida Wildlife Corridor...Most of Florida’s land protection priorities can be achieved by conservation easements, whereby landowners are paid to strip the development rights off of their land and then can continue to manage the land in perpetuity. To fund conservation easements on 100,000 acres annually could cost approximately $500 million. Considering inflation, that is substantially less than the $300 million per year Republican leadership committed in 1990 to Preservation 2000. For additional perspective, $500 million for land conservation is just five percent of the annual $10 billion budget from the Florida Department of Transportation…” Carlton Ward Jr. writes Opinion for the Tampa Bay Times.

Read High sewage overflows after heavy rain on Monday highlights Panama City infrastructure problems- “More than 300,000 gallons of wastewater reportedly overflowed from Panama City’s sewage system on Monday, highlighting growing problems with the city’s infrastructure. The city reported six incidents of wastewater overflows from various manholes, pipes and lift stations to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Some environmental advocates say the total overflow was exceptionally high for a single day and that the city’s aging wastewater system infrastructure was to blame. City officials say they recognize the problems and have plans to address them — from new testing to find and fix the worst trouble spots, to scheduling a set of bigger, long-term street improvement projects. “We have not been bashful in saying our infrastructure is decaying beneath us,” said Mark McQueen, city manager. “What we experienced on Monday was extraordinary rain in a short time that stressed a system that needs help.” The reports cited certain spots with exceptionally high wastewater overflows, caused because the system couldn’t handle the influx of rainwater. Christian Wagley, coastal organizer for Healthy Gulf, a nonprofit environmental watchdog and advocacy group, said he was shocked by the amount of overflow in the city on Monday. “It was the largest amount of sanitary overflow I’ve seen in one day in the Panhandle since I’ve been here,” Wagley said. “I’ve been generally following these reports the last three years and I’ve never seen such a large discharge in such a short time.” One city report stated that 92,400 gallons of wastewater overflowed from a manhole on Highway 98 because one of the 127 lift stations for the city’s sewage system couldn’t handle the extra water...Wagley said that since Hurricane Michael, he’s been working with residents and the Bay County Hurricane Recovery Task Force to develop long-term strategies to repairing and upgrading the city’s infrastructure. “Having a functioning sewer system is just basic for a functioning city,” Wagley said…” Patrick McCreless reports for the Panama City News Herald.

Read Careful where you swim. There’s a lot of poop at popular South Florida and state beaches- “Before heading to the beach, you might want to check if it’s safe to swim at your chosen spot. Elevated poop levels have led to Florida Department of Health swimming advisories for a total of eight beaches in Miami-Dade. Other beaches across the state — including six in Okaloosa County — were also put on warning Wednesday. The advisories for Miami-Dade issued Wednesday were for: Surfside, 93rd Street; North Shore, 73rd Street; Collins Park, 21st Street; South Beach at Collins Avenue; South Beach at South Pointe Drive; and Virginia Beach.” C. Isaiah Smalls II and Carli Teproff report for WLRN.

Read Scientists think toxic algae could be impacting some Florida panthers, bobcats- “It could be mercury or rat poison that's causing some Florida panthers and bobcats in Southwest Florida to display neurological symptoms, but a University of Miami professor and others think it could be related to toxic algae. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has documented several panthers and a bobcat in recent weeks that are exhibiting neurological symptoms.  FWC has confirmed that one of the panthers and one bobcat have shown positive results for neurological damage, which could be what's causing the other cats to behave strangely. Larry Brand, a marine and ecology professor at UM, said a number of pollutants and naturally existing organisms could be at the root of the problem. "The impression I got is that these panthers were along the Southwest coast and they did get the blooms of blue-green algae," Brand said. "I've got to think it is possible they were drinking water from the Caloosahatchee (River) and other areas. I talked to colleagues and they said it’s probably not the case, but it’s possible." Brand said other causes could be mercury poisoning, rat poisoning or something biological.  The Caloosahatchee River and adjoining canals were blanketed by a blue-green algae outbreak last year, and it's not uncommon for panthers to travel relatively long distances..."We’ve got to wait and find out if those reports are credible but it certainly looks like something is going on," said Florida Gulf Coast University professor and scientist Darren Rumbold. "It leans in my mind toward natural toxins like the cyanobacteria, not necessarily ones that people are worried about in the river but there are other species out there. If it is a natural toxin it is probably water contaminated with cyanoabacteria." "While numerous diseases and possible causes — including distemper, cerebellar hypoplasia and degenerative myelopathy — can cause clinical signs similar to those being seen in the panthers and bobcats, and multiple possible causes are being considered, a definitive cause has not been determined," FWC spokewoman Carli Segelson said in an email. "FWC is testing for various potential toxins, including neurotoxic rodenticide (rat pesticide) and other environmental factors, as well as infectious diseases and nutritional deficiencies…” Chad Gillis reports for the Fort Myers News-Press.

Read Senator Linda Stewart re-files bill to remove state preemption on auxiliary plastic and polystyrene containers - “Senator Linda Stewart (D-Orlando) today released Senate Bill 182, which would strike language in Florida statute that forbids municipalities from governing items such as plastic shopping bags and foam containers. “By removing this language we give home rule back to cities and counties allowing them to decide what best fits their needs. Coastal or lakefront communities may wish to ban these containers to reduce pollution that negatively effects other sectors of their economies such as tourism,” said Stewart. In a 2010 study, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection cited the Ocean Conservancy’s findings that determined auxiliary containers such as shopping bags were the most frequently found item during coastal cleanup worldwide, accounting for 8.1% of all items found. “These items that we use thousands of every day are having serious effects on our state’s natural resources. If we do not at least provide the option to reduce the use of these containers, we may damage one of our states biggest economic drivers, Florida’s natural beauties; our waterways and beaches,” said Stewart.”From Florida Senate District 13 press release.

Read Sarasota spoonbill sighting emblematic of resurging species- “The resurgence of one of Florida’s signature birds — the roseate spoonbill — may have been typified by the sighting of a banded member of the species in Sarasota County on July 24. The bird was banded by Audubon Florida as a chick at Alafia Bank in Tampa Bay on May 17, 2008. Jerry Lorenz, director of research at Audubon’s Everglades Science Center, says he has received five positive re-sightings of the bird since 2014, all in Sarasota County: at the Celery Fields, near the Fruitville Library three times and off Coburn Street. Those sightings were based on the bird’s red M6 band. Re-sighting data provides information needed to find and protect critical feeding and nesting areas. Spoonbills nearly vanished from Florida’s landscape in the early 20th century because of the plume trade for women’s hats. After protections kept their colonies safe, the species gradually recovered and began establishing new nesting colonies in South Florida, in the Tampa Bay area and along central Florida’s Atlantic coast, Audubon said. Audubon Florida has officially recorded 1,184 breeding pairs, or 2,368 individual birds, in the state, but believes the actual number may be double that. Still categorized as a threatened species by the state of Florida, spoonbills are often seen in this region, especially by golfers, kayakers and hikers in marshy areas, such as Manatee County’s Robinson Preserve.” Staff report from the Herald-Tribune

Read Saving the Key deer could provide template for ‘state-level action’ in post-ESA world - “Florida is among at least 32 states with its own listing of threatened and endangered species beyond the 2,500 animals, birds, fish, insects and plants protected under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). In fact, excluding plants, of 134 species identified by the Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission (FWC) as “threatened” in the Sunshine State, 95 are protected under the ESA while 39 others are listed by state biologists as “threatened” or “species of special concern” and safeguarded under a state Imperiled Species Management Plan. However, while Florida has its own Endangered and Threatened Species Act, as with other similar laws in other states, it only provides a mechanism for listing and prohibiting the taking and trafficking of endangered and threatened species. State laws are designed to complement the ESA, which includes provisions for recovery, consultation and the protection of critical habitat. With the Trump administration’s pending revisions and rollbacks in the ESA, states – which already manage wildlife – will have to assume a greater, and costlier, role in providing the comprehensive protections of species identified as endangered and threatened now covered and paid for with federal resources. Florida could be facing its first test in addressing its response to a diminished ESA in how it will – or won’t – protect the Key deer, a speciated, dog-sized whitetail deer found nowhere on Earth but in the Lower Florida Keys. Ironically, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) had proposed to de-list Key deer “due to recovery” shortly before the Trump administration announced it was revising the ESA. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio is calling on the FWC and Florida lawmakers to take protecting the Key deer into state hands should it be de-listed and lose its federal protection under the ESA…” John Haughey reports for KPVI


From Our Readers

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Job Openings:

Director of Conservation - Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary- Audubon Florida

Associate Director - Blair Audubon Visitor Center

Land Stewardship Associate - Indian River Land Trust

Executive Director - Choctawhatchee Bay Estuary Program

Organizing Representative, Red Tide & Wildlands Campaign - Gainesville - Sierra Club

Organizing Representative, Red Tide & Wildlands Campaign - Ft. Myers/Naples - Sierra Club

Upcoming Environmental Events:

August 27th - 8:00am-8:00pm - M-CORES Task Force public meeting - (Tampa) - Attend the Multi-Use Corridors of Regional Economic Significance (M-CORES) first public meeting at the Tampa Convention Center Public, 333 S Franklin St, Tampa, FL 33602. Public participation is vital to the M-CORES process, and there are many ways to share your comments or ideas. All three task forces will hold public meetings in their respective corridors. FDOT will also hold community open houses to share progress and gather input. Staff will be available at each open house to answer questions and receive comments. Check the Calendar of Events for upcoming meetings in your area. Sign up today to receive news, notices of upcoming M-CORES meetings and more. Agenda here.

August 27th-28th -Florida Panhandle Forests & Drinking Water Workshop - (Apalachicola) - Join the Florida Forest Service & Workshop Planning Team for a tour and workshop of the Apalachicola Estuary and Tate’s Hell State Forest to learn about the connection between healthy forests and clean water. The tours begin at 1pm on the 27th, starting at Tate’s Hell State Forest, and ending with a boat tour of the Apalachicola Estuary. The workshop begins Wednesday August 28th at 8:00am at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve Nature Center in Eastpoint. The workshop agenda includes both presentations and group discussion sessions. The primary goal is for participants to leave the meeting with tangible “next steps” to accelerate community-based watershed stewardship and protection throughout the Florida Panhandle. Lunch will be included at the August 28th Workshop. For additional information and registration, visit the Eventbrite site here.

August 29th - 5:30pm-7:30pm - Okaloosa County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Shalimar) - Attend the Okaloosa County Delegation meeting at the Okaloosa County Commission Chambers, Suite 100 1250 N Eglin Parkway Shalimar, FL 32579. Stay tuned for contact information and speaker request forms.

August 29th - 6:00pm - Conservation Easement Workshop - (Lake City) - North Florida Land Trust has teamed up with the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to host two free workshops on conservation easements. The workshops are open to landowners with forest or ranch lands in the Ocala to Osceola Wildlife Corridor, which includes parts of Columbia, Baker, Union, Bradford, Clay, Putnam, Marion and Lake Counties (see map). Landowners in these counties could be eligible to apply for conservation easements with the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. Representatives of the partner organizations will explain the benefits and funding opportunities. The first workshop will take place at the UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension Office at 971 W. Duval St. in Lake City. For more information, contact Susan Carr, program manager for NFLT at scarr@nflt.org or (803) 295-2229 or contact Crenal Francis, easement program coordinator at USDA at crenal.francis@usda.gov or (352) 338-9508.

August 30th - 9:00am-3:00pm - Blue-Green Algae Task Force meeting - (Gainesville) - The Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Blue-Green Algae Task Force will hold its next public meting at the University of Florida Levin College of Law, Martin Levin Advocacy Room, 106, 309 Village Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611. This meeting will be live-streamed via the Florida Channel. During the fourth meeting, the Task Force will discuss public health and stormwater regulations. The agenda is available on the Blue-Green Algae Task Force website. All members of the public are welcome to attend.

August 31st - 9:00am-12:00pm - Gulf Coast Ecosystems & Sea Level Rise Impacts field trip - (Yankeetown)- The Sierra Club Adventure Coast invites you to an outing led by Eugene Kelly.  Meet at Bird Creek Beach on County Road 40/Follow That Dream Parkway, located near the mouth of the Withlacoochee River in Yankeetown, FL.  Turn right into the park just before the road ends at the boat ramp (Latitude 29.002, Longitude -82.758). This 3-hour trip will familiarize participants with the coastal ecosystems of Florida’s unspoiled Big Bend coastline and ecological consequences of sea level rise and other climate related changes on them.  We begin at Bird Creek Beach—truly a wild coast.  Bring footwear you won’t mind getting wet and muddy to walk into the salt marsh. Bring other footwear for later. For more information visit the Adventure Coast Group’s Facebook page here , or email sierraadventurecoastcc@gmail.com.

September 5th - 9:00am - Sumter County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Wildwood) - Attend the Sumter County Delegation meeting at The Villages Sumter County Service Center, Room 102, 7375 Powell Road, Wildwood, FL 34785. To be placed on the agenda, or to submit information on local bill requirements, please call State Representative Brett T. Hage's office at (352)-315-4445. Please do so by Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019 by 4:00pm. This is an open public meeting.

September 5th - 6:00pm - August 29th - 6:00pm - Conservation Easement Workshop - (Palatka) - North Florida Land Trust has teamed up with the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to host two free workshops on conservation easements. The workshops are open to landowners with forest or ranch lands in the Ocala to Osceola Wildlife Corridor, which includes parts of Columbia, Baker, Union, Bradford, Clay, Putnam, Marion and Lake Counties (see map). Landowners in these counties could be eligible to apply for conservation easements with the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. Representatives of the partner organizations will explain the benefits and funding opportunities. The second workshop will take place at the Putnam County Extension Center at 111 Yelvington Rd., Suite 1 in East Palatka. For more information, contact Susan Carr, program manager for NFLT at scarr@nflt.org or (803) 295-2229 or contact Crenal Francis, easement program coordinator at USDA at crenal.francis@usda.gov or (352) 338-9508.

September 9th - 6:00pm - Earth Ethics Environmental Education series - (Pensacola) - Join Earth Ethics in welcoming this month’s guest speaker, Grace Resendez McCaffery, owner of Latino Media Gulf Coast, Publisher of La Costa Media Gulf Coast, and Founder of the Hispanic Resource Center of Northwest Florida as she discusses Beyond the Wall: Human Rights and Social Justice beginning at 6 p.m. at Ever’man Education Center 327 W Garden Street, Pensacola, FL 32502. Earth Ethics will discuss some of the environmental impacts associated with the building of the wall. Stay up to date and let us know you’ll be joining us by visiting the Facebook event page here.  

September 9th - 9:00am - Sarasota County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Sarasota) - Attend the Sarasota County Delegation meeting at the Sarasota County Administration Building, First Floor/Commission Chambers, 1660 Ringling Blvd, Sarasota FL 34236. Interested parties wishing to be placed on the agenda should contact GeeDee Kerr in Senator Gruters’ office at kerr.geedee@flsenate.gov as soon as possible but  no later than 5:00pm on September 3, 2019 2019. Written presentations will be limited to 3 pages (can be 2-sided) per organization.  All materials must be submitted electronically and in Word format. 

September 9th – 9:30am – Hillsborough County Legislative Delegation meeting – (Riverview) – Attend the Hillsborough County Legislative Delegation meeting at the Regent, 6437 Watson Road, Riverview, FL 33578. For further information and to be placed on the agenda, complete the speaker request form here by September 4th and/or email Jason Holloway at holloway.jason@flsenate.gov.

September 10th - 1:00pm-5:00pm - Marion County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Ocala) - Attend the Marion County Legislative Delegation meeting at the College of Central Florida, Klein Conference Center3001 SW College Road, Ocala, FL 34474. For additional information or to be placed on the printed agenda to address the Marion County Legislative Delegation, please contact Suzanne McGuire in Senator Perry’s office by Friday, August 29, 2019 by phone at 352-732-1249 or email mcguire.suzanne@flsenate.gov. All materials or handouts for this meeting must be sent to Suzanne McGuire in Senator Perry’s office no later than Friday, August 30, 2019. Please find appearance request form here.

September 12th - 10:00am- Martin County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Stuart) - Attend the Martin County Delegation meeting at the Indian River State College Chastain Campus, Wolf Technology Center, 2400 SE Salerno Road, Stuart, FL 34997. To participate in the delegation meeting, email Joey Planz at Joey.Planz@MyFloridaHouse.gov for an appearance form. Participation form can also be accessed here. Anyone wishing to speak before the Delegation must fill out a participation form and return it to the office no later than noon on September 2, 2019.

September 12th – 9:00am-12:00pm – Pinellas County Legislative Delegation meeting – (Clearwater) – Attend the Pinellas County Legislative Delegation meeting at the St. Petersburg College – Clearwater Campus, Auditorium, 2465 Drew St., Clearwater, FL 33765. To participate in the delegation meeting, contact Anna.Stearns@myfloridahouse.gov and submit the participant request form before September 5th. Agenda and meeting notice will be released at a later date.  

September 15th - 2:00pm-4:30pm - Sustainable Banking/Investing 101 - (St. Petersburg) - Most large banks and many investment funds profit off of fossil fuel expansion. But it doesn't have to be that way! Come learn how to green up your finances with the Suncoast Sierra Club. 2pm-3pm: Sustainable Banking/Q&A 3pm-4pm+: Sustainable Investing/Q&A*Snacks provided*. Visit the Facebook event page here for more information.

September 23rd - 2:00pm-3:30pm - Union County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Lake Butler) - Attend the Union County Delegation meeting at the Lake Butler City Commission Chamber, 200 SW 1st St., Lake Butler, FL 32054. To participate in the delegation meeting, email Rep. Payne’s office at Tammy.Still@myfloridahouse.gov before 3:00pm September 19.

September 23 - 4:30pm-6:30pm - Bradford County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Starke) - Attend the Bradford County Delegation meeting at the Bradford County Commission Chamber, County Courthouse, 945 N Temple Ave, Starke, FL 32091. To participate in the delegation meeting, email contact Rep. Payne’s office at Tammy.Still@myfloridahouse.gov before 3:00pm September 19th.

September 23 - 2:00pm-4:00pm - Citrus County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Inverness) - Attend the Citrus County Delegation meeting at the Citrus Board of County Commissioners’ Chamber Room, Citrus County Court House, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL. To participate in the delegation meeting, email Adele Hembree at Adele.Hembree@myfloridahouse.gov before September 2nd to request an appearance form.

September 23 - 1:30pm - Desoto County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Arcadia) - Attend the Desoto County Delegation meeting at the DeSoto County Commission Board Room, 201 East Oak Street, Arcadia, FL 34266. Email Anne Bell for additional information Anne.Bell@myfloridahouse.gov.

September 25 - 2:00pm-6:00pm - Brevard County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Cape Canaveral) - Attend the Brevard County Delegation meeting at the Canaveral Port Authority Commission Room, 445 Challenger Road, Cape Canaveral FL 32920. To participate in the delegation meeting, email complete the Appearance Request Form here before 5:00pm September 10th. For more information, email Lindsey Swindle at Swindle.Lindsey@flsenate.gov.

September 25 - 2:00pm-4:00pm - Putnam County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Palatka) - Attend the Putnam County Delegation meeting at the Board of County Commissioners Board Room, 2509 Crill Ave, Suite 200, Palatka FL 32177. Stay tuned for contact information and speaker request forms.

September 30th - October 2nd- Public Land Acquisition & Management (PLAM) Partnership 2019 Conference - (St. Augustine) - The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is proud to announce the Public Land Acquisition and Management (PLAM) Partnership Conference. This statewide conference focuses on public land acquisition and management issues in Florida. PLAM has typically been hosted on a rotating basis by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the five water management districts. The conference will be held at the World Golf Village Renaissance Resort (500 S Legacy Trail, St. Augustine, FL 32092). WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Local, regional, state, federal, non-profit and private land managers; Land acquisition specialists and agents; Water managers; Engineers, planners, attorneys, surveyors, appraisers, architects; Public officials; Non-profit groups; Consultants; Others interested in conservation land planning. Registration coming soon. For more information, click here.

October 1st – 3:00pm-6:30pm – Pasco County Legislative Delegation meeting – (New Port Richey) – Attend the Pasco County Legislative Delegation meeting at the River Ridge High School Performing Arts Center, 11646 Town Center Road, New Port Richey, FL 34654. If you would like to be placed on the agenda, please contact Alexander.Alt@myfloridahouse.gov.

October 2nd – 9:00am – Manatee County Legislative Delegation meeting – (Bradenton) – Attend the Manatee County Legislative Delegation meeting at the Manatee County Commission Chambers, 1112 Manatee Avenue West, Bradenton, FL. To be placed on the agenda, please contact Meagan Hebel at meagan.hebel@myfloridahouse.gov no later than noon on Wednesday September 25th.

October 3rd - 9:00am-12:00pm - Palm Beach County Legislative Delegation meeting - (West Palm Beach) - Attend the Palm Beach County Delegation meeting at the Norton Museum of Art, 1450 Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach FL 33401. To be placed on the official agenda of a Delegation hearing, presenters must have completed a Participation Request Form and have submitted all printed materials to the delegation office by Noon, seven (7) business days prior to the scheduled hearing. Fifteen (15) copies of printed material should be submitted to be included in the Members’ hearing folders. Anyone interested in addressing the Legislative Delegation at a Public Hearing should call the Delegation Office at 561-355-3452 or email vnowlan@pbcgov.org. The deadline for submission of local bills to the Delegation Office is September 20, noon. Click here for the Hearing Information Sheet for the 2020 session for instructions on how to be placed on the official agenda and/or the presenter request form.

October 8th – 8:00am-11:00am – Charlotte County Legislative Delegation meeting – (Punta Gorda) – Attend the Charlotte County Legislative Delegation meeting at the Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association, 2001 Shreve Street, Punta Gorda, FL 33950. To be placed on the agenda, email Cynthia.beckett@myfloridahouse.gov before 4:00pm on October 1st, 2019. For more information, see meeting notice here.

October 9th - 1:30pm - Lake County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Leesburg) -Attend the Lake County Delegation meeting at the Paul P. Williams Fine Arts Auditorium, Lake-Sumter State College, 9501 U.S. Highway 441, Leesburg, FL 34788. To participate in the delegation meeting, complete the public speaker request form here before September 18th. Email Rachel Barnes for additional information: BARNES.RACHEL@flsenate.gov.

October 9th - 4:00pm- Nassau County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Yulee) - Attend the Nassau County Delegation meeting at the Nassau County Commission Chambers, 96135 Nassau Place, Yulee, Florida 32097. Stay tuned for contact information and speaker request forms.

October 10th - 6:30pm-8:30pm - Follow the Ichetucknee - (Lake City) - Mark your calendars now for an informal celebration of the Ichetucknee at Halpatter Brewing Company, 264 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. Admission is free! You'll enjoy: Viewing new and newly scored videos about the Ichetucknee by collaborators Eric Flagg and Michael Amish; Meeting directors and members of the Ichetucknee Alliance; Socializing with people who love the Ichetucknee; Tasting craft beer and munching on pizza; Exploring our interconnections with the aquifer, the Ichetucknee, and each other; Finding out what you can do to help restore, protect and preserve the Ichetucknee. We are thrilled that the generous proprietors of Halpatter have offered their venue for this event. Please share this information with anyone you know who might be interested. There's also information about this event on our Facebook page here.

October 10th - 2:30pm - Clay County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Green Cove Springs) -Attend the Clay County Delegation meeting at the Clay County Commission Chambers, 477 Houston St. Green Cove Springs, FL 32043. To participate in the delegation meeting, complete the public speaker request form here before 3:00pm October 8th. Email Tammy Still for additional information: Tammy.Still@myfloridahouse.gov.

October 30th - 9:00AM - Collier County Legislative Delegation meeting - (Naples) -Attend the Collier County Delegation meeting at the North Collier Regional Park, 15000 Livinston Rd. Naples, FL 34109. The agenda will be released to the news media on Thursday, October 17, 2019, to allow the citizens of Collier County ample time to prepare comments if they so desire. If you would like to be placed on the agenda as a presenter of a local bill or local budget request, or to speak to another issue, please contact the office at (239) 417-6200 or Priscilla.Grannis@myfloridahouse.gov by Friday, October 11, 2019. For more information, review announcement here.

November 18 – 1:00pm-4:00pm – Hernando County Legislative Delegation meeting – (Brooksville) – Attend the Hernando County Legislative Delegation meeting at the Hernando County Government Center, 20 N Main Street, Courtroom A, 2nd Floor, Brooksville, FL 34601. Additional information will be forthcoming.

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Petitions

Stop South Florida's Sewage Sludge from Polluting the St. Johns River!

Stop Giving Away Florida’s Water

Save Lake County-Say NO to the Round Lake Road Extension

Save the Heritage Trees at Martin Luther King Jr. Park - Winter Park

Help Save Our Panthers

Thinking of going electric? Nextcar Pledge

Another Gulf is Possible

Save the Serenova Tract in Pasco – Say NO to the Ridge Road Extension

Florida Solar Bill of Rights

Protect Florida’s Gulf Coast from Offshore Drilling

Stop New Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida

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